8 Must-See Places in Central and East Europe: Hot Spots in Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Bulgaria and More

8 Must-See Places in Central and East Europe: Hot Spots in Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Bulgaria and More

Born and raised in Poland, MIR’s Director of Sales Joanna Millick has traveled all over Central and East Europe. Here are some of her personal favorite places.

Hidden from view for much of the 20th century, the hip and historic countries of Central and East Europe can boast gorgeous countryside, congenial people and sturdy villages as well as rococo capitals and medieval town centers. Changing with every moment that goes by, these places should be visited now before they are fully and irretrievably “discovered”… but where to start?

1. Krakow, Poland

2. Lviv, Ukraine

3. Kiev, Ukraine

4. Moldova

5. Transdniester, Communist Time Capsule

6. Budapest, Hungary

7. Gdansk, Poland

8. Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Celebration in Poland

Celebration in Poland
Photo credit: Polish National Tourist Board

Travel to Central and East Europe with MIRNo matter where you go, it’s important to travel with an experienced tour operator. MIR has over two decades of Central and East Europe travel experience and our small group tour, Belarus, Ukraine & Moldova, was honored by National Geographic Traveler as a “Tour of a Lifetime.”

Fodor’s Travel Intelligence blog praised MIR for expertise in planning custom trips for travelers exploring their roots in Central and East Europe.

Explore MIR’s Destination Map or Trip Finder to explore some of the tour options. Or connect with me by phone (800-424-7289) or email to discuss your travel ideas.

(Top photo: Krakow rooftops. Photo credit: Martin Klimenta)

PUBLISHED: January 23, 2015

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2 thoughts on “8 Must-See Places in Central and East Europe: Hot Spots in Poland, Ukraine, Moldova, Bulgaria and More

  • Why Tree red Necklace in tipical custum ? What does it mean ?

    • Emily Kelso

      Hi Alice, In the old days, Polish folk costumes featured red because it was thought to scare away demons and evil spirits. Dancing was an important part of Polish festivals and rituals, especially during springtime and the harvest, so it was important that any bad luck be chased away to fully partake in the celebrations.