Why Travel the Silk Road, and Why Now?

Why Travel the Silk Road, and Why Now?

The Silk Road was not a single road; it was a far-flung web of lonely camel track routes from East to West and back again. Mother of all road trips, the Silk Road became a conduit for spreading belief systems, architecture, agriculture, music and art to the world. Read More


MIR Spotlight: Anvar Nasimov

MIR Spotlight: Anvar Nasimov

MIR’S Anvar Nasimov was born and raised in one of the most fascinating places on the planet: Samarkand, Uzbekistan, heart of the Silk Road. Anvar offers his perspective on his country, and the satisfaction he feels in showing travelers the beauty and history of his beloved homeland. Read More





5 Places to See Before You Die: A Silk Road Journey with Patricia Schultz and MIR

5 Places to See Before You Die: A Silk Road Journey with Patricia Schultz and MIR

MIR was honored to have Patricia Schultz, author of the best-selling travel book, 1,000 Places to See Before You Die, among the 14 travelers who set out for the Five ‘Stans with us earlier this year. Read More


Hidden Treasures: Savitsky Museum of “Forbidden Art”

Hidden Treasures: Savitsky Museum of “Forbidden Art”

Hidden in plain sight in a Central Asian desert, once-banned Soviet paintings of a time gone by are treasured and preserved at the Savitsky Museum in remote Nukus, Uzbekistan. The story of how they got here is the stuff of movies – literally. Read More




San Francisco Silk Road

San Francisco Silk Road

Headlined by an article about world traveler and extreme chef Anthony Bourdain, host of CNN’s “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown,” this travel insert to the San Francisco Chronicle also features an engaging article on the Silk Road, one of MIR’s core destinations.“Bourdain delivers travel gems as a prelude to tantalizing details–and the unspoken reminder that the more we know, the more we realize we don’t know. The natural remedy is to travel and to discover certain principles that broaden your worldview forevermore once you’ve returned home.” A modern traveler can only imagine what the Silk Road was like in its heyday in the early years of the last millennium, but so much remains in Central Asia of that era that your imagination can fill in the details fairly accurately. You can’t help but imagine lines of camels making their grumpy, flat-footed way over the scraggly hills from watering hole to wateringaaaRead More