Tehran’s Golestan Palace: A Photo Essay

Tehran’s Golestan Palace: A Photo Essay

One of the highlights of Iran‘s capital city, Tehran, is one of its oldest clusters of buildings. 

The lavish UNESCO-listed Golestan Palace complex is only what remains after the 20th century Pahlavi court razed some of the original buildings. The palace is the first and, so far, the only UNESCO Site in the modern city of Tehran, and still inspires Persian poets and architects.

“Golestan” means “rose garden,” and a lovely rose garden is indeed at its core. But there is such a treasure trove of decorative art adorning every inch of the palace that it far outshines the beauty of the garden. In the late 18th century, the leader of Iran’s Qajar Dynasty transformed Tehran’s original citadel into his royal court and residence, centering it on a classically-styled walled rose garden. 


The Qajar family succeeded in combining increasing western influences with Persian arts, architecture and crafts in this richly decorated seat of government.

Entryway to the palace through the old citadel walls<br>Photo: Lindsay Fincher

Tiled entryway to the palace through the old citadel walls
Photo credit: Lindsay Fincher

The complex includes the Marble Throne, created from 65 pieces of yellow Yazd marble, and held up by carved figures. Photo credit: Lindsay Fincher

The complex includes the Marble Throne, created from 65 pieces of yellow Yazd marble, and held up by carved figures
Photo credit: Lindsay Fincher

Golestan Palace in Tehran, Iran. Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

Glittering mirror work decorates an open-air throne room in Golestan Palace, Tehran
Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

Golestan Palace in Tehran, Iran. Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

Stained glass filigrees in Golestan Palace 
Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

Golestan Palace in Tehran, Iran. Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

Marble figure atop the Marble Throne in Golestan Palace, Tehran
Photo credit: Meaghan Samuels

The beautiful tilework shows the introduction of European styles into Persian traditional arts during the Qajar Dynasty. Photo: Martin Klimenta

The beautiful tilework shows the introduction of European styles into Persian traditional arts during the Qajar Dynasty
Photo credit: Martin Klimenta


Travel to Iran with MIR

MIR has more than 15 years of travel experience hand-crafting tours to Iran. Our full service, dedication, commitment to quality, and destination expertise have twice earned us a place on National Geographic Adventure’s list of Best Adventure Travel Companies on Earth.”

You can visit Iran in a number of ways: on a small group tour, on a rail journey by private train,  or on an independent trip put together just the way you want it.

Chat with Joanna about travel to Iran by phone (800-424-7289) or email today. She has an insider’s knowledge of what to do and see in Iran, and would love to help you craft a tour that satisfies your curiosity about this ancient and modern country.

Top photo: The Marble Throne in its regal setting, Golestan Palace in Tehran. Photo credit: Lindsay Fincher 

PUBLISHED: May 3, 2016

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